Miss Alice Kinney Tripp and Col. C. H. Graves, newly-appointed minister to Norway and Sweden, were married at the home of the bride's parents. Mr. and Mrs. Denison W. Tripp, Welles Avenue, Athens, Pa., on Tuesday April 25, 1905 at 2:30 o'clock by Rev. H. H. Graves, of Towanda.

It was considered a high honor to be called as Miss Tripp was from her modest unpretending home to take the position of leading lady in the royal court life of one of the foremost diplomatic nations of the world. She was considered admirably fit for the position and all of her friends congratulated her upon her deserved good fortune.

Miss Tripp was born in Sheshequin and owes her superior mental and moral qualities to a noble ancestry and her own habits of industry in cultivating the best gifts. Julia Scott Kinney, the gifted author, who has interwoven the scenes of that romantic valley with sweet poesy and song, was one of her ancestors, while on her father's side there stands a record of pioneer sacrifice and heroism that has few equals. All of these combine to make up the charm of true womanly excellence with which the bride was endowed.

Miss Tripp was born in Sheshequin and owes her superior mental and moral qualities to a noble ancestry and her own habits of industry in cultivating the best gifts. Julia Scott Kinney, the gifted author, who has interwoven the scenes of that romantic valley with sweet poesy and song, was one of her ancestors, while on her father's side there stands a record of pioneer sacrifice and heroism that has few equals. All of these combine to make up the charm of true womanly excellence with which the bride was endowed.

The husband, Col. C. H. Graves, of Duluth, Minnesota, had an eventful life and had risen to prominence through his sterling traits of noble manhood. He was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, and after passing through his years of study in the common schools he acquired and academic education and was ready to enter a professional life when the Civil War broke out. He enlisted at the age of 22 as a private in the 40th New York Infantry Volunteers and entered at once into active service. His regiment was assigned to Kearney's division, Third Corps, Army of the Potomac, commanded by General D. Sickles. They saw hard service from the start to the finish and C. H. Graves was promoted to lieutenant and finally won his way to the command of the regiment.

After the war was over he entered the regular service and was stationed in Minnesota in 1866. In 1870 he resigned his commission in the army and became a citizen of Minnesota. In 1873 he was elected to the State senate, representing the counties of St. Louis, Lake, Ithaca, Carleton and Cass until 1876. He was afterward Mayor of Duluth for two terms, and in 1884 was made a delegate at large of the Republican National Convention held in Chicago which nominated Blaine for President of the United States. He re-entered State politics and in 1885 was elected to the State Legislature and in 1889 was made Speaker of the House.

When it was decided that this appointment should go to Minnesota, Senator Nelson sent for Col. Graves to come to Washington as he wished to have a consultation with him on important business. He immediately went as requested and then Senator Nelson said that the appointment of this important mission was conceded to Minnesota and that he had been selected for the post, and if he would accept that they would go over and see the President. They accordingly went and saw President Roosevelt and his appointment was made at once. On his way back he called upon Miss Tripp, at Athens, and the arrangements for their wedding were completed.

At a meeting of the Commercial Club at Duluth, held after his return, there were about 20 Scandinavians circled around him and they presented him with a fine American flag. Dr. J. M. O. Tufty, on presenting the flag said that this gift was offered as an expression of the good feeling and esteem of the Scandinavians of the city and was accompanied by their best wishes for his success and happiness during his sojourn as a representative of the United States in the capital of their native land and for his entire future life. This token brings a message to our friends over there of the great regard we hold you, and that we, living on these shores, shall expect them to extend to you the courtesies becoming an honorable citizen and a representative of our adopted country. At a farewell banquet given April 10th, Colonel Graves in responding to a speech of congratulations said that he did not feel that he alone was capable of performing all the things his friends expected but that he was to have an able assistant in Miss Alice Kinney Tripp, of Athens, Pa., to whom he was to be married April 25, 1905, at the home of the bride and immediately after the ceremony they would sail for Sweden.

This was the presage of the ceremony that was performed on Tuesday, April 25 in the simple unostentatious way with only the friends of the family present. After the ceremony was over, Mr. and Mrs. Graves took the Black Diamond for New York where he had business to attend to before they left on their far-off journey. They sailed Thursday, April 27, 1905 on the steamer Deutschland.

While doing research for this article, I came across a marriage license for Charles Hinman Graves and Alice Kinney Tripp. The license stated that both had been previously married. Col Graves was married first to Elizabeth Grace Stevens, a widow who was 50 years old when they married May 20, 1873. Col Graves was 35 at the time. Elizabeth Grace Graves was the daughter of Joseph Gilbert and Cattyna Totten of Washington, D.C. Elizabeth Grace Graves died on October 25, 1902 in Duluth, Minnesota. They had no children.

Alice Kinney Tripp was married on August 4, 1892 in Athens, Pa., to the Rev. Alfred Ellsworth Wright. The couple met while Divinity students at St. Lawrence University, Canton, N.Y. They were both ordained ministers and from 1894 to 1903 they co-pastored Reconciliation Church and other churches in Brooklyn, N.Y. Alice divorced the Rev. Alfred E. Wright December 19, 1904 for lack of support. She retired from the active ministry at that time and moved to Syracuse, NY then to her parents home in Athens. Pa.

Charles H., Graves was 65 when he married Alice, who was 35. They spent from 1905 until 1913 in the government service to Norway and Sweden. Charles H. Graves died on October 7, 1928. Alice Tripp Graves died on April 13, 1949. She is buried in Tioga Point Cemetery. In her will she left $75,000 ($776,861 today) to the Divinity School at St. Lawrence University. This was the largest bequest to the school in the history of the institution.

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Henry Farley is a founding member and a current board member of the Sayre Historical Society. He is also president of the Bradford County Historical Society.

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