Skip to main content
A1 A1
News
Confirmed COVID-19 cases continue to increase

According to the COVID-19 patient status infographic, posted on the Guthrie Clinic’s Facebook page on Friday, there were 89 COVID-positive patients hospitalized — up eight in a week — and 16 in the ICU — a decrease of four.

Those numbers include patients from all four Guthrie hospitals (Sayre, Troy, Corning and Cortland) and the Robert Packer Hospital’s Towanda campus.

Of the hospitalized cases, 58 are unvaccinated and 31 are vaccinated — an increase of five and three, respectively. Of those in the ICU, the number of unvaccinated held steady at 12 and the vaccinated decreased to four.

The number of confirmed cases in Bradford County has risen by 768 in the past week according to data from the Pennsylvania Department of Health’s COVID-19 dashboard, bringing the total number to 11,677 since the start of the pandemic.

The number of deaths attributed to COVID-19 in Bradford County has risen by three in the past seven days, for a pandemic total of 179.

The Sayre ZIP Code (18840) has recorded 192 more confirmed cases in the past week, for a total of 2,478 since March of 2020. Athens (18810) was home to another 152 confirmed cases this week — for a pandemic total of 1,673 — and Towanda saw another 77 confirmed cases in the past seven days, for a total of 1,453.

Five other Bradford County ZIP Codes have had more than 500 confirmed cases since March of 2020. In the past week Troy saw an increase of 50 for a pandemic total of 928, Canton increased by 46 for a total of 685, Wyalusing increased by 36 for a total of 708, Gillett increased by 28 for a total of 576, and Rome increased by 39 for a total of 556.

Out of Bradford County’s 60,323 residents, 22,952 are fully vaccinated — an increase of 150 in the past week. Another 2,943 have received the first dose of a two-dose vaccine — an increase of 104 — while 9,708 residents have received a booster shot — an increase of 754.

Confirmed case numbers in Tioga County, Pa. have risen by 212 over the past week, for a pandemic total of 5,364.

In the same time the county’s COVID-19 death toll has risen by three, for a total of 179.

The Wellsboro ZIP Code area has seen 74 more confirmed cases in the past seven days, for a total of 1,389 since March of 2020. The Mansfield ZIP Code is the only other in the county to report more than 500 confirmed cases since March of 2020, currently sitting at 685 — an increase of 29 in seven days.

Of the 40,591 residents in Tioga County, Pa., 17,185 are fully vaccinated — an increase of 122 in the past week. Another 1,976 have currently received one dose of a two-dose vaccine — a decrease of one — and 7,550 have chosen to receive a booster dose — an increase of 473.

According to the New York State Department of Heath, Tioga County, N.Y. has seen a total of 9,609 confirmed cases since the start of the pandemic.

According to the Tioga County Public Heath Department’s press release on January 19, the number of new cases in the county as of January 18 was 594, while the number of active cases was reported as 278.

Of the new cases, 62 were unvaccinated, 136 were vaccinated, 51 were children under the age of 12, and 345 had unknown vaccination statuses; only 13 cases were reported as hospitalized, and no new deaths have been attributed to COVID-19 in the county.

Of the 48,560 residents in Tioga County, N.Y., 28,260 are fully vaccinated according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — an increase of 185 in one week. Another 4,509 have received one dose of a two-dose vaccine — an increase of 113 — and 12,523 have received a booster dose — an increase of 684.

According to data from the Chemung County Health Department’s COVID-19 dashboard, Chemung County has seen 1,210 new cases in the past week, for a total of 19,881 since the pandemic began.

The county currently has 751 active cases, down 691 from last week. Of those active cases, only 65 are hospitalized. Six more deaths attributed to COVID-19 in Chemung County bring the total to 184.

Of the 83,456 residents in Chemung County, 48,584 are fully vaccinated according to the CDC — an increase of 356 in one week. Another 7,381 have received the first dose of a two-dose vaccine — an increase of 134 — and 22,620 have received a booster dose — an increase of 982.


News
COVID-19 cases for county children increase, new study shows effects in hospitalized kids

COVID-19 cases in children in Bradford County have increased, while a new study in the commonwealth shows the neurological effects that the virus has on kids.

As of Jan. 19, the Pennsylvania Department of Health reported the following information for COVID-19 cases in children living in Bradford County from the period of Jan. 12 to 18:

COVID-19 cases in children aged 0-4: 38

COVID-19 cases in children aged 5-18: 207

The recent data is an increase for both age groups compared to the previous data period of Jan. 5 to 11, in which there were 32 cases for children ages 0 to 4 and 140 cases for children ages 5 to 18.

This is also an increase compared to the period of Dec. 29 to Jan. 4, in which there were 20 cases for children ages 0 to 4 and 87 cases for children ages 5 to 18.

While cases in children increase locally, universities in the commonwealth are presenting their latest findings on how kids are being specifically effected.

A pediatrician-scientist at UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine led a new study that says 44% of hospitalized children who tested or were presumed positive for COVID-19 developed neurological symptoms and were more likely to require intensive care than their peers who didn’t experience such symptoms.

The most common neurologic symptoms were headache and altered mental status, known as acute encephalopathy. Published in Pediatric Neurology, these preliminary findings are the first insights from the pediatric arm of GCS-NeuroCOVID, an international consortium trying to understand COVID-19’s effects on the brain and nervous system.

“The SARS-CoV-2 virus can affect pediatric patients in different ways: It can cause acute disease, where symptomatic illness comes on soon after infection, or children may develop an inflammatory condition called MIS-C weeks after clearing the virus,” said lead author Ericka Fink, M.D., pediatric intensivist at UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, and associate professor of critical care medicine and pediatrics at Pitt. “One of the consortium’s big questions was whether neurological manifestations are similar or different in pediatric patients, depending on which of these two conditions they have.”

Researchers recruited 30 pediatric critical care centers around the world. Of 1,493 hospitalized children, 1,278, or 86%, were diagnosed with acute SARS-CoV-2; 215 children, or 14%, were diagnosed with MIS-C, or multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, which typically appears several weeks after clearing the virus and is characterized by fever, inflammation and organ dysfunction.

The most common neurologic manifestations linked with acute COVID-19 were headache, acute encephalopathy and seizures, while youths with MIS-C most often had headache, acute encephalopathy and dizziness. Rarer symptoms of both conditions included loss of smell, vision impairment, stroke and psychosis.

“Thankfully, mortality rates in children are low for both acute SARS-CoV-2 and MIS-C,” said Fink. “But this study shows that the frequency of neurological manifestations is high—and it may actually be higher than what we found because these symptoms are not always documented in the medical record or assessable. For example, we can’t know if a baby is having a headache.”

The analysis showed that neurological manifestations were more common in kids with MIS-C compared to those with acute SARS-CoV-2, and children with MIS-C were more likely than those with acute illness to have two or more neurologic manifestations.

According to Fink, the team recently launched a follow up study to determine whether acute SARS-CoV-2 and MIS-C—with or without neurologic manifestations—have lasting effects on children’s health and quality of life after discharge from hospital.

“Another long-term goal of this study is to build a database that tracks neurological manifestations over time—not just for SARS-CoV-2, but for other types of infections as well,” she added. “Some countries have excellent databases that allow them to easily track and compare children who are hospitalized, but we don’t have such a resource in the U.S.”

This study was partly funded by the Neurocritical Care Society Investing in Clinical Neurocritical Care Research (INCLINE) grant.


Back